Season's Readings from Simmons SLIS!

The 500 Hats of
Bartholomew Cubbins

The Adventures of Taxi Dog

Alanna: The First Adventure

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

by
Lewis Carroll

The poem from Through the Looking Glass, “The Walrus and the Carpenter”, was one of the longest poems I memorized when I was young for a small book club of which I was a member. Much later, I recited that poem with someone when we began dating and it was cited as one of the things that first made us fall in love.

All of a Kind Family

Ameilia’s Notebook

Ameilia’s Notebook

by
Marissa Moss

When I was maybe six, put on my tutu, took my giant stack of what was probably 25–30 Golden Books, and sat down on the couch as though I were going to read them all in one sitting. There is photographic evidence somewhere!

— Katherine Green, current student

Animorphs

Anne of Green Gables

Anne of Green Gables

by
L. M. Montgomery

I vividly remember finding this book on a lower shelf that separated the children’s room from the next room in the basement of the Bennington Free Library. I started reading it there and checked it out and brought it home. I had a feeling of discovery and ownership as I read, like this was MY book and no one else’s since I’d found it, no one had told me about it, and I wasn’t reading it for school. I eventually bought my own copy (which I still own, and which I used to carry my wedding ring when I got married two years ago; my husband used Leaves of Grass) and over the years I read and bought everything I could find by Montgomery and loved Anne even more after seeing the CBC miniseries. Visiting PEI and the Maritime provinces a few years ago was a dream fulfilled that lived up to and surpassed all hopes and expectations.

— Megan Dowd Lambert ’02GS, Children’s Literature, Senior Lecturer

Annie and the Wild Animals

Baby Island

Baby Island

by
Carol Ryrie Brink

My grandfather contributed to making me the reading that I am. Each week, out of his $5 allowance my grandmother doled out to him, he would purchase a book to give to me. He introduced me to the world of mysteries with Nancy Drew, Trixie Belden and the Dana Girls and to the classics with Little Women and many many more. No matter that I could not read every word. These books were exciting and I loved the characters and I read them over and over and over again. He believed in me as a reader (though I was in the low reading group and the nun declared to my parents that I would never be a reader. Shows how little she knew.) He believed in the power of reading. With each book it was one less Phillies game he attended. I am forever grateful for what he did. I am a reader, I am a librarian, and at the age of 6 when he gave me my first book Nancy Drew and the Ringmaster’s Secret he had no idea as to how he would shape my life forever.

— Chris Swerling ’76LS

The Babysitter’s Club

Bartholomew and the Oobleck

Bears in the Night

Bedtime for Francis

Behind the Attic Wall

The Best Christmas Pageant Ever

Black Boy

Blueberries for Sal

Blueberries for Sal

by
Robert McCloskey

All of my memories of reading that book (and all other Robert McCloskey masterpieces) are at my grandmother’s house. She’s who I inherited my love of reading from.

The Book of Three

The Box of Important Things

The Box of Important Things

by
Ann Hellie

I remember checking it out of the library over and over again. My mother kept asking if I wanted to check out another book and for a while I only wanted that book. It is ironic because the book is about keeping a few important things in a box and protecting them and then I became an archivist. I am happy to report I recently found a copy of the book and it has a place of honor on my bookshelves.

— Lisa Carole Long Feldmann ’97LS

Bread and Jam for Frances

Bridge to Teribithia

Catherine, Called Birdy

Catherine, Called Birdy

by
Karen Cushman

I learned to read when my older sister did. I sat in my parents’ laps and they didn’t realize they were teaching me, too! So, I got to read all of her books as soon as she was done with them. Catherine, Called Birdy kickstarted my lifelong love of medieval history and sarcastic girl heroines. It taught me I was at my best when I was myself, from the very start.

— Liz Wright, current student

Charlotte’s Web

Charlotte’s Web

by
E. B. White

My teacher’s sister was the librarian, and would send me to the library to help her so that I would not distract the other children. The librarian let me shelve books and organize the card catalog. As a thank you present, at the end of the year she gifted me a copy of Charlotte’s Web.

— Jeanne Wallace-Buckley,
SLIS Administrative Manager

Chrysanthemum

Curious George

Curious George

by
H. A. Rey

My father was a Coast Guard Captain and had to go away during the summer. He taped (on a cassette — early 80’s!) himself reading the books to me so I could “read them with him” while he was gone.

The Dark is Rising

Dear America:
Voyage on the Great Titanic

Dog Goes to Nursery School

Dog Goes to Nursery School

by
Lucille Hammond

My mom gave me this book to help ease my mind about starting nursery school, and I fell in love with it. The best part is that she saved it, and now I read it to my son!

— Lindsey Gumb ’11LS

The Egypt Game

The Egypt Game

by
Zilpha Keatley Snyder

My cousins and I made up our own game based on the above book! We were Egyptian High Priestesses, made altars to the various gods, and made up our own ceremonies, chants, and hieroglyphic alphabet.

— Emily Robinson, current student

Ella Enchanted

Ella Enchanted

by
Gail Carson Levine

I’ve been an avid reader for as long as I can remember. My book shelf was in a closet in my bedroom, so sometimes after I pulled a book off the shelf, I would just sit down right there in the closet to read. I would get so caught up in whatever I was reading that I usually wouldn’t even hear someone calling me and my mom would come into my room to find me reading in the closet or on the bedroom floor. To this day I still get really engrossed in books and don’t always notice when someone starts talking to me while I’m reading.

Eloise

The Enchanted Castle

The Enchanted Wood

The Fire Cat

The Folk of the Faraway Tree

Follow my Leader

From the Mixed-Up Files of
Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

The Giraffe and the Pelly and Me

The Giver

Go, Dog, Go!

Goodnight Moon

Hank the Cowdog

Hans Christian Andersen Fairy Tales

Harold and the Purple Crayon

Harriet the Spy

Harry Potter Series

Harry Potter Series

by
J. K. Rowling

Reading Harry Potter was a family affair. We’d get a new hardback copy each time a book came out and we’d read it in turns, usually on vacation at the shore. I’d get the book first because I wouldn’t do anything but read until I was done. Then I’d have to wait really impatiently to talk to my family about it once they got to each amazing part. The books not only meant a lot to me, but also are now fond memories of family.

— Katie (Sallade) Olivo ’14LS

Harry Potter and the
Chamber of Secrets

Harry Potter and the
Order of the Pheonix

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

by
J. K. Rowling

I hated reading before Harry Potter. And when I said hated, nothing could tempt me to sit and read a book (as much as you could read in Kindergarten.) But when I dad sat me down and I heard “Mr and Mrs Dursley, of number four, Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much” my life was changed. I changed and I didn’t even know it yet. From this moment I still hated reading, but I would let my dad read this to me all the time. When I finally began to read, it was Harry Potter all the time. I widened my spectrum once I got to be a better reader, but I credit my love for books to Mrs. Rowling.

— Molly Newcomb, current student

Holes

The Homeward Bounders

The Inheritance

Island of the Blue Dolphins

Journey to the River Sea

Katie Morag and the Tiresome Ted

The Kid in the Red Jacket

The Last of the Really
Great Whangdoodles

The Last Unicorn

A Light in the Attic

The Lion, the Witch,
and the Wardrobe

The Little Engine that Could

The Little Engine that Could

by
Watty Piper

Loved this book and asked for it to be read to me over and over. Mother discussed the importance of optimism and perseverance in the face of challenges.

The Little House

The Little House

by
Virginia Lee Burton

Like many kids, I used to beg for stories to be read before I went to bed. This is one that I particularly loved my mother to read aloud to me. It was an old copy from the 1960’s and the little house in the book always reminded me of my grandmother’s house. Being from a rural area I loved seeing the cityscapes and loved the uplifting message that the little house wasn’t forgotten in the end. I recently found a copy in the library I work at now and the memories hit like a ton of bricks.

Little House in the Big Woods

Little House in the Big Woods

by
Laura Ingalls Wilder

My mother read this series to me and when we finished On the Shores of Silver Lake in November, she insisted that we take a break because “there is no way I am reading The Long Winter during a winter in New England!”

A Little Princess

Little Women

The Lorax

The Lord of the Rings

Lord of the Rings

by
J. R. R. Tolkien

My family was on a long summer camping trip, and my dad was reading The Fellowship of the Ring out loud to my mom. There were reading sessions each night around the campfire, and I was absolutely captivated, even though I was not the intended primary audience. I still remember vividly the evening that Dad got to the part where the Nazgul meet up with the company at Weathertop, and the characters are sitting with their backs to their fire, waiting for disaster to strike. I turned around and put MY back to the fire as I was listening; I was no longer camping — I was there, in the story, living it. After we went to bed, my dad read on to my mom. When I found out I’d missed some of it after bedtime, I was pretty upset. My dad laughed and said, “It’s OK — the next part was just a council meeting with lots of adults talking.” I didn’t care; I was hooked! I let him know he was NOT supposed to go on if I wasn’t listening too! To this day, I am a devotee of reading out loud to others — to kids, to partners, to friends, whoever. It makes the magic come alive.

— Susan Creighton, SLIS alum

Love You Forever

Madeline

Madeline

by
Ludwig Bemelmans

Every night after getting ready for bed, my mother would settle me in and read to me. I must have been 3 or 4 years old when she first read Madeline and it quickly became one of my favorite stories. I loved the classic house covered in vines, I became obsessed with Paris, and I wanted to be just as adventurous as Madeline. We read the book together so many times that soon I was anticipating phrases from the next page and, before long, reading words on my own. The bedtime ritual is still one of my most precious memories and fostered a budding love of literature that bloomed over the years.

— Ashley Judson ’11LS

Mail-Order Wings

Mail-Order Wings

by
Beatrice Gormley

I loved the idea of growing my own wings and flying with birds. I was old enough to know that this could never happen, but this book made me feel like there was still a slight chance.

Marshmallow

Matilda

Mike Mulligan and the Steam Shovel

Milk and Cookies

Mirette on the High Wire

Moomin

Moomin

by
Tove Jansson

My grandparents put a white sheet on a wall and would play a projector slideshow of the illustrations while we read the book together.

— Rina Sandler, current student

Mothers Can Do Anything

Mr. Apple’s Family

Mr. Apple’s Family

by
Jean McDevitt

With five girls in tow, my mother’s favorite weekly summer activity was to head to the air conditioned library. I found the book Mr. Apple’s Family at the Pembroke, MA library, the town of our summer family’s summer cottage. Returning to Dedham, I could never find this exact book during the school year. Each summer, after first grade I would go to the Pembroke library and check Mr. Apple’s Family out. I grew up loving family stories such as Little Women. As an adult, I was so excited when The Penderwicks: A Summer Tale of Four Sisters, Two Rabbits, and a Very Interesting Boy was published, I gave signed copies to my nieces. Mr. Apple’s Family not only allowed me to tuck away, look forward, escape and enjoy “the story,” it allowed me to want to share my love of a title and all the experiences with others.

— Georgina Trebbe ’06LS

Mr. Gumpy’s Outing

My Father’s Dragon

My Great-Aunt Arizona

Mythology

Peach & Blue

Peter and Wendy

Peter and Wendy

by
J. M. Barrie

As a child, I used to curl up in my chair during snowstorms and read for hours.

The Phantom Tollbooth

Pippi Longstocking

Popple Peeking

The Rainbow Fish

Ramona Collection

Ramona Quimby, Age 8

Ramona Quimby, Age 8

by
Beverly Cleary

I vividly remember the sensation of being transported to another space and time, and for me that’s where my love for reading started.

Ramona the Pest

Redwall

The Runaway Bunny

The Secret Garden

The Secret of the Old Clock

Sideways Stories from
Wayside School

The Snowy Day

The Snowy Day

by
Ezra Jack Keats

It felt good to see a little boy who was the same color as me.

The Stinky Cheese Man

Swallows and Amazons

Swallows and Amazons

by
Arthur Ransome

I used to read under the kitchen table while my mother was making dinner, in trees when we were in the country, and, of course, under the covers with a flashlight. I was a voracious and immersive reader; very little could disturb me, and I would snarl at people who tried. Still true.

— Candy Schwartz, SLIS Faculty

The Tale of Desperaux

The Tale of Desperaux

by
Kate DiCamillo

This was my very first chapter book! Remember, when you’re a kid and you see all the older people reading bigger, more exciting books. This was the book that transitioned me from those wonderful picture books to explorations of new worlds and wonder!

To Kill a Mockingbird

Treasure Island

The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs

Twenty and Ten

Twenty and Ten

by
Claire Huchet Bishop

This was the first time that I made the leap from reading as a conscious effort to a seamless immersion into the world of the story. It hooked me on reading forever.

Understood Bessy

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

Where the Red Fern Grows

Where the Sidewalk Ends

Where the Sidewalk Ends

by
Shel Silverstein

My grandmother gave me a copy of Where the Sidewalk Ends for Christmas. It was a hard cover book all my own, filled with amusing short poems and simple illustrations. I used to read the poems over and over again until I had the whole book memorized. Silverstein’s words are encouraging and whimsical, even a bit clever, but they are also kind and kind-hearted. I had nearly forgotten about the poems until my daughter was born and they all came tumbling out of my head. She now has the copy my grandmother bought for me on her own bookshelf. This one is my favourite: HUG O’WAR I will not play tug o’ war. I’d rather play hug o’ war, Where everyone hugs Instead of tugs, Where everyone giggles And rolls on the rug, Where everyone kisses, And everyone grins, And everyone cuddles, And everyone wins.

— Rebecka Sheffield, SLIS Faculty

The Wind in the Willows

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

by
L. Frank Baum

To help us be calm during thunderstorms when we were little, my mother would read to me and my older sister, Kate. I remember how cozy it felt to cuddle together on my parents’ bed and be transported to that wonderful world of imagination: Oz. I fell in love with thunderstorms while falling in love with books. What a wonderful gift my mother gave me!

The Wolves of Willoughby Chase

The Woman Who Rides Like a Man

The Woman Who Rides Like a Man

by
Tamora Pierce

I remember being devastated that the book was not on the shelf in the children’s section. I was sure that it was lost and I would not be able to continue on Alanna’s journey. My little brother brought me (sobbing) to the children’s librarian, who calmly handed me a tissue, took me by the hand and led me to the YA section where she produced the book. She agreed that the series was fantastic and that it can be sad when we don’t find what we are looking for, but a Librarian can help.

— Bridgett Kathryn Pride, current student

A Wrinkle in Time

Click on the bouncing books to read our memories